1. image: Download

    http://9eyes.tumblr.com/
Artist Jon Rafman’s 9Eyes catalogues unique moments in time entirely through Google Street View - scooter accidents, animals, sheets drying in the sun, people looking out windows. 
And prostitutes, a good number of prostitutes. 

    http://9eyes.tumblr.com/

    Artist Jon Rafman’s 9Eyes catalogues unique moments in time entirely through Google Street View - scooter accidents, animals, sheets drying in the sun, people looking out windows. 

    And prostitutes, a good number of prostitutes. 

     
  2. Pretty rad project in New York City. Not sure if it applies specifically to anyone, but it’s dealing with public space and communication in the digital age so it’s relevant to all of us in some way.

    The Urban Speaker is an art installation that transforms public space into an instant stage for mass communication. This portable urban furniture allows people to broadcast their voice in public by calling a telephone number from their mobile phones

    The project explores the possibilities of urban media spaces created by the introduction of telecommunication and interactive technologies into our built environments. Temporary interventions such as this seek to re-imagine what our personal and social experience of public spaces can be in an age of ubiquitous nonstop communication.

     
  3. This sounds like an amazing project in Europe, one that is looking at the boundaries between the real and virtual in public space. 

    For one month, the Céramique district of Maastricht and the city centre of Hasselt will be transformed into an open exhibition area. Through this temporary intervention in public areas,For Real is challenging people to view and interpret the video art and to experience public areas in a different way. Because these art structures are visible from the street, fiction and reality literally blend into one another. For Real temporarily brings a new reality to our familiar surroundings.

    Perhaps we can get a site visit.

     
  4. For Story People: One City One Story

    “One City One Story is a project to encourage people in and around Boston to read the same short story and create community around the shared experience. Our goal is to make a piece of short fiction available to as many people as possible, free of charge.”

    In the weeks leading up to the Boston Book Festival (Oct. 16) 30,000 copies of ‘The Smile on Happy Chang’s Face’ will be available, as well as online and in translation. Author Tom Perrotta - who wrote Election and Little Children - lives in Boston, though the story is not set there.

    Sort of analog, but it’s something. I have a copy on my desk. www.bostonbookfest.org/1c1s

     
  5. Check out his portfolio too! Some interesting projects, especially the Museum of Amazement in Inman Square. Thesis includes analysis of Yellow Arrow, [murmur] in Toronto, and Proboscis in London - lots of ideas for storytelling in public space! Especially for Matt but cool for everyone to see, this guy’s work is rad!

     
  6. Another public art project from John Ewing, Symphony of a City:

    "Dynamic individuals, from a homeless person to a multi-millionaire, were nominated by over 50 community groups from across Greater Boston, to wear tiny video cameras on their heads and document life from their perspective for a day. Eight outstanding citizens were selected. The project premiered at the 2001 Boston Cyberarts Festival where over the course of two days the videos the participants generated were streamed in real-time on the Web and presented as large scale outdoor video projections on the facade of Boston City Hall. The video from each of the participants was juxtaposed so that at any given moment four stories, four lives, four perspectives were in view. The project now exists as a gallery installation, an experimental single channel documentary and an interactive cyber documentary on this web site."

     
  7. An interview with artist John Ewing about his project up this summer that linked Dudley Square and Coolidge Corner, Brookline by videoscreen and microphone set up in shop windows. 

    Mr. Ewing lives in Roxbury, might be an interesting person to talk to/bring in?

     
  8. Just for fun - Crochet Guevara documents the guerrilla yarn/textile art movement in Philadelphia. Lamppost cozies seem to be a speciality. 
Certainly one way to soften the urban world.

    Just for fun - Crochet Guevara documents the guerrilla yarn/textile art movement in Philadelphia. Lamppost cozies seem to be a speciality. 

    Certainly one way to soften the urban world.

     
  9. Syllabus from Kio Stark’s Interactive Telecommunications Program at NYU. A great - if occasionally pretentious - overview of why stranger interactions in cities are meaningful, the spaces and significance of the spaces in which strangers interact, and how strangers watch, listen and follow each other.

     
  10. image: Download

    Artist Peter Feigenbaum has a photography show up in NYC combining his impressively-detailed scale model of a transit ghetto (think the Bronx circa 1978) with contemporary images of a gentrifying Park Slope. Interesting mix of real/imagined cityscapes.
Bonus: Pete is/was/may be the second guitarist for Titus Andronicus.

    Artist Peter Feigenbaum has a photography show up in NYC combining his impressively-detailed scale model of a transit ghetto (think the Bronx circa 1978) with contemporary images of a gentrifying Park Slope. Interesting mix of real/imagined cityscapes.

    Bonus: Pete is/was/may be the second guitarist for Titus Andronicus.

     
  11. An useful read if you’re interested in questions of participation in public spaces.

     
  12. Two Cambridge-based artists who have done numerous public art projects in the Boston area. 

     
  13. Check out the interactive map.